Browse ›

Past Exhibitions: 2010

Ended on February 14, 2010

The Museum will present the Quay Brothers' 1985 short The Epic of Gilgamesh on the east façade from sunset to 11:00 pm nightly.

Ended on March 21, 2010

The most popular early use of photography was recording the likenesses of friends and loved ones. Conceptions of portraiture have changed dramatically, and this exhibition looks at the recent “up close and personal” approach.

Ended on March 21, 2010

Concerted efforts in postwar Japan to revive traditional crafts and reestablish national identity fostered the flourishing of a ceramic arts movement that continues to thrive today.

Ended on March 28, 2010

Sam Jury (Cornell MFA 1998) creates an animated portrait that is no one and everyone all at once, suspending the spectator between places and experiences remembered and imagined.

Ended on March 28, 2010

Historical photographic processes and their use by contemporary photographers in our increasingly digital age, organized by the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin.

Ended on April 18, 2010

The Johnson Museum and Cornell Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections present prints, books, manuscripts, and portraits reflecting the culture of the French Renaissance court.

Ended on April 18, 2010

James Siena (Class of 1979) is the 2009–10 recipient of the Eissner Artist of the Year Award from the Cornell Council for the Arts, which the CCA and the Museum are celebrating with a very personal exhibition of work selected exclusively from his studio.

Ended on March 28, 2010

From the iconic monumentality of hanging scrolls to the conceptual rhetoric of contemporary photographs, the Chinese landscape is always evolving.

Ended on June 13, 2010

From theoretical landscapes to direct observations, this exhibition explores the evolution of Chinese artists' approaches to depicting the natural world in the Yuan, Ming, and Qing dynasties.

Ended on June 13, 2010

Curated by the History of Art Majors' Society, this exhibition explores iconic as well as strange representations of the human figure.

Ended on July 11, 2010

Photographic work, video, and a major topographical installation made from recycled cardboard by this assistant professor and director of graduate studies in Cornell's College of Architecture, Art, and Planning's Department of Art.

Ended on August 1, 2010

Highlights of a private collection of pieced quilts made in American in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Ended on September 12, 2010

Two life-size figurative sculptures, by Folkert de Jong and Wil Ryman, show that the figure is alive and well in contemporary sculpture, addressing a wide variety of topical issues.

Ended on October 3, 2010

At the end of the 19th century, Alfred Stieglitz changed the way artists approached the photographic process, pushing them and himself to create works that would place photography among the fine arts.

Ended on October 3, 2010

Highlighting the word of the Wiener Werkstätte from a private collection, alongside decorative works that were created to be used and lived with from the Johnson's collection.

Ended on October 3, 2010

Contemporary artists from the Middle East, Central Asia, and their diasporas, whose works use different methods of translation.

Ended on October 31, 2010

The first comprehensive exhibition of prints produced by the artist thus far in her career.

Ended on January 2, 2011

This exhibition examines trees in art—both as muse for artists inspired by the beauty and variety of trees in the natural environment, and as a means for representing human history, abstract concepts, and scientific knowledge.

Ended on January 9, 2011

Wood engravings cut on the end grain of wood have been used in prints and commercial illustration for over two centuries.

Ended on March 20, 2011

Modern and contemporary works by a distinguished group of international artists, highly experimental in their abstracted forms and expressive glazing.

Ended on January 9, 2011

From early 20th-century modernists, to the works of the WPA Administration artists during the Depression, to contemporary realists, this exhibition celebrates the very personal interaction of collectors with their art, and the story this art tells about 20th-century American life.